• Diet During Cutting Cycle

    Home Forums Nutrition Bulking/Gaining Weight Diet During Cutting Cycle

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    • #849

      I am in the process of developing my diet for an upcoming cutting cycle. However, while doing the calculations, I came across something that stumped me. Your input would be greatly appreciated.

      Estimated BMR (4,000 Calories/Day)

      Caloric Restriction (1,000 Calories/Day)

      Total Calories (3,000 Calories/Day)

      Meal Frequency (6 Meals/Day)

      Calories/Meal (500)

      Macronutrient Distribution = 40% Protein, 40% Carbohydrate (Complex with post-workout meal being the exception), 20% Fat (1/3 Saturated, 1/3 Monounsaturated, 1/3 EFA)

      Conversions:

      Protein = 3.9 Calories/Gram

      Carbohydrate = 3.9 Calories/Gram

      Fat = 8.8 Calories/Gram

      1 Ounce = 28.35 Grams

      Therefore, a typical meal would look like this:

      500 Calories

      Protein = 200 (200/3.9 = 51.28 grams) (51.28/28.35 = 1.81 Ounces)

      Carbs = 200 (200/3.9 = 51.28 grams) (51.28/28.35 = 1.81 Ounces)

      Fat = 100 (100/8.8 = 11.36 grams) (11.36/28.35 = 0.40 Ounces)

      I was feeling good about this until I looked at a nutrition information label on some sliced turkey. The label stated that 1 ounce of the product only had 7.86 grams of protein. Therefore, my 1.81 Ounce portion would have had 14.23 grams of protein. Naturally, I was dumbfounded as I had thought that I was getting 51.28 grams of protein per meal. Obviously, I left out an important variable in my calculations. Please help assist me in pointing out my error. It is late and I am tired so the solution may present itself in the morning (errr, a bit later in the morning ). Thank you for your input.

      #62602

      str8flexed
      Member

      I’m sorry if I missed something but didn’t you just point out your own mistake, I don’t see your question. I would also repartition your carb intake. Raise it up pre workout and post workout when you need them the most and lower them a bit at other times.

      you must be hella big to have a BMR of 4000.

      Peace

      #62604

      ShadowJack
      Member

      Your calculation of 51.28g is the amount of (grams of) protein you need to have 200 calories coming from protein. That does not directly equate to the weight of the food that you are eating. No food is 100% protein by weight; there is other stuff in there.

      For example: a serving of Optimum’s 100% Whey Protein yields 22g of protein per 28.4g serving size. I would expect turkey to have an even smaller ratio of protein to serving size (weight), since whey protein powder seems to be a pretty pure source of protein, compared to most whole foods.

      #62627

      Your calculation of 51.28g is the amount of (grams of) protein you need to have 200 calories coming from protein. That does not directly equate to the weight of the food that you are eating. No food is 100% protein by weight; there is other stuff in there.

      You are correct. I found the missing variables that I was looking for. For example, a 3 oz serving of cooked (broiled) top sirloin beef would yield 25.81 grams of protein per serving. Thus, my serving size of 51.28 grams (1.81 oz) would yield 14.26 grams of protein. The following website has nutritional lists for all macronutrient types:

      [url=”http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/Data/SR15/wtrank/wt_rank.html”]http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/Data…nk/wt_rank.html[/url]

      This website provides a wealth of information. I would encourage everyone to take a look. Enjoy!

      #62631

      I’m sorry if I missed something but didn’t you just point out your own mistake, I don’t see your question.  I would also repartition your carb intake.  Raise it up pre workout and post workout when you need them the most and lower them a bit at other times.  

      you must be hella big to have a BMR of 4000.

      Peace

      My reasoning behind this is to keep muscle and glycogen stores full. As stated previously, my post-workout meal will differ from my other meals in that it will contain simple carbohydrates. In all likelihood, the post workout meal will be a MRP with added simple carbs. All other meals will consist of only low GI complex carbs as well as protein and fat.

      Perhaps, I should consider ingesting the bulk of my carbs in the morning (as I typically workout at that time). If this were done, my afternoon and evening meals would consist of primarily protein and fat. In essence, I would be limiting carbohydrate consumption after the noon hour.

      Do you think that my carbohydrate consumption is too high to achieve my fatloss goals? Obviously, this diet is no “set in stone” and therefore, I am open to suggestions. Thank you for your insight.

      BTW, I am 6’2″, 230 lbs with a LBM of 188

      #62638

      str8flexed
      Member

      if your lean bodymass is 188 your calories are entirely too high to cut unless your have an unreal metabolism but judging by your LBM to bodymass ratio you don’t have that fast of a metabolism. With an average metabolism at a lean bodymass of 188 I would cut at 2800 kcals.

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