• vagus nerve and anxiety

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    • #831128

      eclypz
      Member

      All I can add to this conversation is that when I quit smoking the last time (hopefully final time I became very overwhelmed with an excessive urge to yawn all the time. I believe my studies led me to the vagus nerve and dopamine but I don’t remember what I came up with exactly.

      #831129

      eclypz
      Member

      All I can add to this conversation is that when I quit smoking the last time (hopefully final time I became very overwhelmed with an excessive urge to yawn all the time. I believe my studies led me to the vagus nerve and dopamine but I don’t remember what I came up with exactly.

      #831130

      eclypz
      Member

      All I can add to this conversation is that when I quit smoking the last time (hopefully final time I became very overwhelmed with an excessive urge to yawn all the time. I believe my studies led me to the vagus nerve and dopamine but I don’t remember what I came up with exactly.

      #831227

      Anonymous

      Posture and muscular fluidity.

      #831228

      Anonymous

      Posture and muscular fluidity.

      #831229

      Anonymous

      Posture and muscular fluidity.

      #831299

      Anonymous
      QUOTE (Sprinkles @ Oct 9 2009, 05:57 PM) [url=”index.php?act=findpost&pid=571191″][/url]
      Posture and muscular fluidity.

      can you elaborate please

      #831300

      Anonymous
      QUOTE (Sprinkles @ Oct 9 2009, 05:57 PM) [url=”index.php?act=findpost&pid=571191″][/url]
      Posture and muscular fluidity.

      can you elaborate please

      #831301

      Anonymous
      QUOTE (Sprinkles @ Oct 9 2009, 05:57 PM) [url=”index.php?act=findpost&pid=571191″][/url]
      Posture and muscular fluidity.

      can you elaborate please

      #832507

      HeadDoc
      Member

      there are some possible answers here:

      [url=”http://www.clinicalpsychologist.com/clinicalpsychologist/Vaso-Vagal1_frm.htm”]http://www.clinicalpsychologist.com/clinic…-Vagal1_frm.htm[/url]

      #832509

      HeadDoc
      Member

      there are some possible answers here:

      [url=”http://www.clinicalpsychologist.com/clinicalpsychologist/Vaso-Vagal1_frm.htm”]http://www.clinicalpsychologist.com/clinic…-Vagal1_frm.htm[/url]

      #832510

      HeadDoc
      Member

      there are some possible answers here:

      [url=”http://www.clinicalpsychologist.com/clinicalpsychologist/Vaso-Vagal1_frm.htm”]http://www.clinicalpsychologist.com/clinic…-Vagal1_frm.htm[/url]

      #832511

      HeadDoc
      Member

      there are some possible answers here:

      [url=”http://www.clinicalpsychologist.com/clinicalpsychologist/Vaso-Vagal1_frm.htm”]http://www.clinicalpsychologist.com/clinic…-Vagal1_frm.htm[/url]

      #832512

      HeadDoc
      Member

      there are some possible answers here:

      [url=”http://www.clinicalpsychologist.com/clinicalpsychologist/Vaso-Vagal1_frm.htm”]http://www.clinicalpsychologist.com/clinic…-Vagal1_frm.htm[/url]

      #833348

      Anonymous
      QUOTE (HeadDoc @ Oct 13 2009, 12:54 AM) [url=”index.php?act=findpost&pid=571575″][/url]
      there are some possible answers here:

      [url=”http://www.clinicalpsychologist.com/clinicalpsychologist/Vaso-Vagal1_frm.htm”]http://www.clinicalpsychologist.com/clinic…-Vagal1_frm.htm[/url]

      That is not a bad link but can someone please inform us all about vagus nerve stimulation in general? I have read about it here and there for a while but the discussion is too technical really if one goes to a medical site. I am more interested in practical applications, and there seem to be many. Things ranging from holding your breath to dunking your head in cold water to meditation seem to have an impact on the vagus nerve but has anyone been able to use either any of these or other methods with success?

      thanks in advance

      #833349

      Anonymous
      QUOTE (HeadDoc @ Oct 13 2009, 12:54 AM) [url=”index.php?act=findpost&pid=571575″][/url]
      there are some possible answers here:

      [url=”http://www.clinicalpsychologist.com/clinicalpsychologist/Vaso-Vagal1_frm.htm”]http://www.clinicalpsychologist.com/clinic…-Vagal1_frm.htm[/url]

      That is not a bad link but can someone please inform us all about vagus nerve stimulation in general? I have read about it here and there for a while but the discussion is too technical really if one goes to a medical site. I am more interested in practical applications, and there seem to be many. Things ranging from holding your breath to dunking your head in cold water to meditation seem to have an impact on the vagus nerve but has anyone been able to use either any of these or other methods with success?

      thanks in advance

      #833350

      Anonymous
      QUOTE (HeadDoc @ Oct 13 2009, 12:54 AM) [url=”index.php?act=findpost&pid=571575″][/url]
      there are some possible answers here:

      [url=”http://www.clinicalpsychologist.com/clinicalpsychologist/Vaso-Vagal1_frm.htm”]http://www.clinicalpsychologist.com/clinic…-Vagal1_frm.htm[/url]

      That is not a bad link but can someone please inform us all about vagus nerve stimulation in general? I have read about it here and there for a while but the discussion is too technical really if one goes to a medical site. I am more interested in practical applications, and there seem to be many. Things ranging from holding your breath to dunking your head in cold water to meditation seem to have an impact on the vagus nerve but has anyone been able to use either any of these or other methods with success?

      thanks in advance

      #833351

      Anonymous
      QUOTE (HeadDoc @ Oct 13 2009, 12:54 AM) [url=”index.php?act=findpost&pid=571575″][/url]
      there are some possible answers here:

      [url=”http://www.clinicalpsychologist.com/clinicalpsychologist/Vaso-Vagal1_frm.htm”]http://www.clinicalpsychologist.com/clinic…-Vagal1_frm.htm[/url]

      That is not a bad link but can someone please inform us all about vagus nerve stimulation in general? I have read about it here and there for a while but the discussion is too technical really if one goes to a medical site. I am more interested in practical applications, and there seem to be many. Things ranging from holding your breath to dunking your head in cold water to meditation seem to have an impact on the vagus nerve but has anyone been able to use either any of these or other methods with success?

      thanks in advance

      #833404

      Anonymous

      [b]Background[/b]:
      The vagus nerve is responsible for activating the parasympathetic nervous systems (PNS), responsible for the rest-and-digest response that promotes restoration of our body (homeostasis). This is the opposite of the sympathetic nervous system (SPS), which is responsible for the fight-or-flight response (and thus anxiety), which promotes preparing our body for a threat (allostasis).

      [b]One-Time Tricks:[/b]
      There are secret “vasovagal maneuvers” you can learn in order to quickly/strongly activate your vagus nerve. The best one is to basically bear down and squeeze your abs/intestines as if you’re having a bowel movement on the toilet, or the valsalva maneuver (e.g. breathing against a closed glottus), or emmersing your face in cold water (i.e. mammalian diving reflex). I’ve tested these–when I wear my heart rate monitor, my heart rate drops 10-20bpm within a few seconds, which is pretty impressive.

      However, you probably can’t and shouldn’t do these maneuvers all the time, so it provides only a temporary effect. But it can be useful for interrupting an anxious cycle (particularly a panic attack), and centering one’s self, so that you can chose not to take avoidant action.

      [b]Long-Term Tricks:[/b]
      Now you can learn a breathing exercise to promote vagal activity and PNS dominance over SNS dominance (I’ve written a scientific paper on this). It’s based on the premise that inhalation inhibits the vagus nerve and exhalation activates it. So you want to breathe in a way where you spend 5x more time exhaling than inhaling (while keeping the volume of air exchanged the same in both phases). This is the type of breathing encouraged by biofeedback devices like the StressEraser. It doesn’t eliminate anxiety altogether, but can certainly shift the focus back to relaxation, especially if practiced with mindfulness of the breath.

      #833405

      Anonymous

      [b]Background[/b]:
      The vagus nerve is responsible for activating the parasympathetic nervous systems (PNS), responsible for the rest-and-digest response that promotes restoration of our body (homeostasis). This is the opposite of the sympathetic nervous system (SPS), which is responsible for the fight-or-flight response (and thus anxiety), which promotes preparing our body for a threat (allostasis).

      [b]One-Time Tricks:[/b]
      There are secret “vasovagal maneuvers” you can learn in order to quickly/strongly activate your vagus nerve. The best one is to basically bear down and squeeze your abs/intestines as if you’re having a bowel movement on the toilet, or the valsalva maneuver (e.g. breathing against a closed glottus), or emmersing your face in cold water (i.e. mammalian diving reflex). I’ve tested these–when I wear my heart rate monitor, my heart rate drops 10-20bpm within a few seconds, which is pretty impressive.

      However, you probably can’t and shouldn’t do these maneuvers all the time, so it provides only a temporary effect. But it can be useful for interrupting an anxious cycle (particularly a panic attack), and centering one’s self, so that you can chose not to take avoidant action.

      [b]Long-Term Tricks:[/b]
      Now you can learn a breathing exercise to promote vagal activity and PNS dominance over SNS dominance (I’ve written a scientific paper on this). It’s based on the premise that inhalation inhibits the vagus nerve and exhalation activates it. So you want to breathe in a way where you spend 5x more time exhaling than inhaling (while keeping the volume of air exchanged the same in both phases). This is the type of breathing encouraged by biofeedback devices like the StressEraser. It doesn’t eliminate anxiety altogether, but can certainly shift the focus back to relaxation, especially if practiced with mindfulness of the breath.

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