• Lyrica and sleep

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    • #788283

      avantgarde
      Member

      I had the same experience and I belive Necrosis noted this as well.

      After doing some digging it appears that Lyrica enchanches nonrapid eye movement sleep and decreases rapid eye movement sleep.
      Along these lines Pregabalin induces dose-dependent increases in relative delta power after administration (link to a nifty study).

      [url=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11714899?ordinalpos=72&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum”]http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1171489…Pubmed_RVDocSum[/url]

      So why is this a big deal ?

      The deepest stage of non-REM (NREM) sleep, characterized by a larger amount of synchronized slow-wave EEG (brainwave activity) than in other stages. These slow waves are called delta activity. During slow-wave sleep (SWS) the brain becomes less responsive to external stimuli; it is considered the deepest sleep as it is the hardest stage from which to awaken.

      Basically SWS appears to be very important for the restorative effects of sleep, check out the sections in the Wikipedia article, especially under Restoration, anabolic and memory processing :

      [url=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#cite_note-31″]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#cite_note-31[/url]

      So how does Lyrica differ from classical sedatives eg benzos ?

      A double-blind study in healthy volunteers to assess the effects on sleep of pregabalin compared with alprazolam and placebo.Hindmarch I, Dawson J, Stanley N.
      HPRU Medical Research Centre, University of Surrey, School of Biomedical & Molecular Sciences, Egerton Road, Guildford, UK.

      STUDY OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of pregabalin compared with alprazolam and placebo on aspects of sleep in healthy volunteers. DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled, 3-way crossover. SETTING: Single research center. PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: Healthy adult (12 men) volunteers (N=24) received oral pregabalin 150 mg t.i.d., alprazolam 1 mg t.i.d., and placebo t.i.d. for 3 days. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Objective sleep was measured by an 8-channel polysomnograph; subjective sleep was measured using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire. Compared with placebo, pregabalin significantly increased slow-wave sleep both as a proportion of the total sleep period and the duration of stage 4 sleep. Alprazolam significantly reduced slow-wave sleep. Pregabalin and alprazolam produced modest, but significant, reductions in sleep-onset latency compared with placebo. Rapid eye movement sleep latency after pregabalin was no different than placebo but was significantly shorter than that found with alprazolam. Although there were no differences between the active treatments, both pregabalin and alprazolam reduced rapid eye movement sleep as a proportion of the total sleep period compared with placebo. Pregabalin also significantly reduced the number of awakenings of more than 1 minute in duration. Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire ratings of the ease of getting to sleep and the perceived quality of sleep were significantly improved following both active treatments, and ratings of behavior following awakening were significantly impaired by both drug treatments. CONCLUSIONS:Pregabalin appears to have an effect on sleep and sleep architecture that distinguishes it from benzodiazepines. Enhancement of slow-wave sleep is intriguing, since reductions in slow-wave sleep have frequently been reported in fibromyalgia and general anxiety disorder.

      [b]Basically while benzos makes shut-eye easier, sleep quality goes down the toilet. Lyrica does the opposite.

      Now to answer your question are there other substances that has similiar effect on sleep quality ?[/b]

      Yes, option A = Gabitril (Tiababine) :

      Pilot study of lorazepam and tiagabine effects on sleep, motor learning, and impulsivity in cocaine abstinence.Morgan PT, Malison RT.
      Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine and Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, Connecticut 06519, USA. [email]peter.morgan@yale.edu[/email]

      OBJECTIVES: To test the effects of mechanistically different GABA modulating agents on the disrupted sleep and cognitive function associated with abstinence from cocaine. METHODS: We examined the effects of lorazepam and tiagabine on polysomnographically measured sleep and cognition in six cocaine dependent persons. Participants were studied during the first and second week of controlled abstinence following intravenous, laboratory cocaine administration. RESULTS: Lorazepam and tiagabine decreased sleep latency, but whereas lorazepam markedly increased light sleep, tiagabine caused a dramatic shift toward slow-wave sleep. Despite increasing total sleep time, lorazepam impaired sleep dependent learning and increased next day impulsivity. CONCLUSIONS: These results introduce the possibility of different, sleep-related cognitive effects of mechanistically distinct GABAergic sedative hypnotics.

      Option B = Neurontin (Gabapentin) :

      Gabapentin increases slow-wave sleep in normal adults.Foldvary-Schaefer N, De Leon Sanchez I, Karafa M, Mascha E, Dinner D, Morris HH.
      Department of Neurology, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44195, USA. [email]foldvan@ccf.org[/email]

      PURPOSE: The older antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have a variety of effects on sleep, including marked reduction in rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, slow-wave sleep (SWS), and sleep latency, and an increase in light sleep. The effects of the newer AEDs on sleep are unknown. Our purpose was to study the effect of gabapentin (GBP) on sleep. METHODS: Ten healthy adults and nine controls were the subjects of this study. All underwent baseline and follow-up polysomnography (PSG) and completed sleep questionnaires. After baseline, the treated group received GBP titrated to 1,800 mg daily. Polygraphic variables and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) scores, a subjective measure of sleep propensity, were compared by using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. RESULTS: Nine of the treated subjects achieved the target dose; one was studied with 1,500 mg daily because of dizziness experienced at the higher dose. GBP-treated subjects had an increase in SWS compared with baseline. No difference in the ESS or other polygraphic variables was observed. However, a minor reduction in arousals, awakenings, and stage shifts was observed in treated subjects. CONCLUSIONS: GBP appears to be less disruptive to sleep than are some of the older AEDs. These findings may underlie the drug’s therapeutic effect in the treatment of disorders associated with sleep disruption.

      So you got Lyrica, Neurontin and Gabitril. Not sure about short-and long term safety though, there are reports of seizures and other side-effects in non-epileptics.

      #788284

      avantgarde
      Member

      I had the same experience and I belive Necrosis noted this as well.

      After doing some digging it appears that Lyrica enchanches nonrapid eye movement sleep and decreases rapid eye movement sleep.
      Along these lines Pregabalin induces dose-dependent increases in relative delta power after administration (link to a nifty study).

      [url=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11714899?ordinalpos=72&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum”]http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1171489…Pubmed_RVDocSum[/url]

      So why is this a big deal ?

      The deepest stage of non-REM (NREM) sleep, characterized by a larger amount of synchronized slow-wave EEG (brainwave activity) than in other stages. These slow waves are called delta activity. During slow-wave sleep (SWS) the brain becomes less responsive to external stimuli; it is considered the deepest sleep as it is the hardest stage from which to awaken.

      Basically SWS appears to be very important for the restorative effects of sleep, check out the sections in the Wikipedia article, especially under Restoration, anabolic and memory processing :

      [url=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#cite_note-31″]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#cite_note-31[/url]

      So how does Lyrica differ from classical sedatives eg benzos ?

      A double-blind study in healthy volunteers to assess the effects on sleep of pregabalin compared with alprazolam and placebo.Hindmarch I, Dawson J, Stanley N.
      HPRU Medical Research Centre, University of Surrey, School of Biomedical & Molecular Sciences, Egerton Road, Guildford, UK.

      STUDY OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of pregabalin compared with alprazolam and placebo on aspects of sleep in healthy volunteers. DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled, 3-way crossover. SETTING: Single research center. PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: Healthy adult (12 men) volunteers (N=24) received oral pregabalin 150 mg t.i.d., alprazolam 1 mg t.i.d., and placebo t.i.d. for 3 days. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Objective sleep was measured by an 8-channel polysomnograph; subjective sleep was measured using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire. Compared with placebo, pregabalin significantly increased slow-wave sleep both as a proportion of the total sleep period and the duration of stage 4 sleep. Alprazolam significantly reduced slow-wave sleep. Pregabalin and alprazolam produced modest, but significant, reductions in sleep-onset latency compared with placebo. Rapid eye movement sleep latency after pregabalin was no different than placebo but was significantly shorter than that found with alprazolam. Although there were no differences between the active treatments, both pregabalin and alprazolam reduced rapid eye movement sleep as a proportion of the total sleep period compared with placebo. Pregabalin also significantly reduced the number of awakenings of more than 1 minute in duration. Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire ratings of the ease of getting to sleep and the perceived quality of sleep were significantly improved following both active treatments, and ratings of behavior following awakening were significantly impaired by both drug treatments. CONCLUSIONS:Pregabalin appears to have an effect on sleep and sleep architecture that distinguishes it from benzodiazepines. Enhancement of slow-wave sleep is intriguing, since reductions in slow-wave sleep have frequently been reported in fibromyalgia and general anxiety disorder.

      [b]Basically while benzos makes shut-eye easier, sleep quality goes down the toilet. Lyrica does the opposite.

      Now to answer your question are there other substances that has similiar effect on sleep quality ?[/b]

      Yes, option A = Gabitril (Tiababine) :

      Pilot study of lorazepam and tiagabine effects on sleep, motor learning, and impulsivity in cocaine abstinence.Morgan PT, Malison RT.
      Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine and Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, Connecticut 06519, USA. [email]peter.morgan@yale.edu[/email]

      OBJECTIVES: To test the effects of mechanistically different GABA modulating agents on the disrupted sleep and cognitive function associated with abstinence from cocaine. METHODS: We examined the effects of lorazepam and tiagabine on polysomnographically measured sleep and cognition in six cocaine dependent persons. Participants were studied during the first and second week of controlled abstinence following intravenous, laboratory cocaine administration. RESULTS: Lorazepam and tiagabine decreased sleep latency, but whereas lorazepam markedly increased light sleep, tiagabine caused a dramatic shift toward slow-wave sleep. Despite increasing total sleep time, lorazepam impaired sleep dependent learning and increased next day impulsivity. CONCLUSIONS: These results introduce the possibility of different, sleep-related cognitive effects of mechanistically distinct GABAergic sedative hypnotics.

      Option B = Neurontin (Gabapentin) :

      Gabapentin increases slow-wave sleep in normal adults.Foldvary-Schaefer N, De Leon Sanchez I, Karafa M, Mascha E, Dinner D, Morris HH.
      Department of Neurology, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44195, USA. [email]foldvan@ccf.org[/email]

      PURPOSE: The older antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have a variety of effects on sleep, including marked reduction in rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, slow-wave sleep (SWS), and sleep latency, and an increase in light sleep. The effects of the newer AEDs on sleep are unknown. Our purpose was to study the effect of gabapentin (GBP) on sleep. METHODS: Ten healthy adults and nine controls were the subjects of this study. All underwent baseline and follow-up polysomnography (PSG) and completed sleep questionnaires. After baseline, the treated group received GBP titrated to 1,800 mg daily. Polygraphic variables and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) scores, a subjective measure of sleep propensity, were compared by using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. RESULTS: Nine of the treated subjects achieved the target dose; one was studied with 1,500 mg daily because of dizziness experienced at the higher dose. GBP-treated subjects had an increase in SWS compared with baseline. No difference in the ESS or other polygraphic variables was observed. However, a minor reduction in arousals, awakenings, and stage shifts was observed in treated subjects. CONCLUSIONS: GBP appears to be less disruptive to sleep than are some of the older AEDs. These findings may underlie the drug’s therapeutic effect in the treatment of disorders associated with sleep disruption.

      So you got Lyrica, Neurontin and Gabitril. Not sure about short-and long term safety though, there are reports of seizures and other side-effects in non-epileptics.

      #788876

      Anonymous
      QUOTE (avantgarde @ Jul 10 2009, 02:00 AM) [url=”index.php?act=findpost&pid=558987″][/url]
      I had the same experience and I belive Necrosis noted this as well.

      After doing some digging it appears that Lyrica enchanches nonrapid eye movement sleep and decreases rapid eye movement sleep.
      Along these lines Pregabalin induces dose-dependent increases in relative delta power after administration (link to a nifty study).

      [url=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11714899?ordinalpos=72&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum”]http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1171489…Pubmed_RVDocSum[/url]

      So why is this a big deal ?

      The deepest stage of non-REM (NREM) sleep, characterized by a larger amount of synchronized slow-wave EEG (brainwave activity) than in other stages. These slow waves are called delta activity. During slow-wave sleep (SWS) the brain becomes less responsive to external stimuli; it is considered the deepest sleep as it is the hardest stage from which to awaken.

      Basically SWS appears to be very important for the restorative effects of sleep, check out the sections in the Wikipedia article, especially under Restoration, anabolic and memory processing :

      [url=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#cite_note-31″]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#cite_note-31[/url]

      So how does Lyrica differ from classical sedatives eg benzos ?

      A double-blind study in healthy volunteers to assess the effects on sleep of pregabalin compared with alprazolam and placebo.Hindmarch I, Dawson J, Stanley N.
      HPRU Medical Research Centre, University of Surrey, School of Biomedical & Molecular Sciences, Egerton Road, Guildford, UK.

      STUDY OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of pregabalin compared with alprazolam and placebo on aspects of sleep in healthy volunteers. DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled, 3-way crossover. SETTING: Single research center. PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: Healthy adult (12 men) volunteers (N=24) received oral pregabalin 150 mg t.i.d., alprazolam 1 mg t.i.d., and placebo t.i.d. for 3 days. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Objective sleep was measured by an 8-channel polysomnograph; subjective sleep was measured using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire. Compared with placebo, pregabalin significantly increased slow-wave sleep both as a proportion of the total sleep period and the duration of stage 4 sleep. Alprazolam significantly reduced slow-wave sleep. Pregabalin and alprazolam produced modest, but significant, reductions in sleep-onset latency compared with placebo. Rapid eye movement sleep latency after pregabalin was no different than placebo but was significantly shorter than that found with alprazolam. Although there were no differences between the active treatments, both pregabalin and alprazolam reduced rapid eye movement sleep as a proportion of the total sleep period compared with placebo. Pregabalin also significantly reduced the number of awakenings of more than 1 minute in duration. Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire ratings of the ease of getting to sleep and the perceived quality of sleep were significantly improved following both active treatments, and ratings of behavior following awakening were significantly impaired by both drug treatments. CONCLUSIONS:Pregabalin appears to have an effect on sleep and sleep architecture that distinguishes it from benzodiazepines. Enhancement of slow-wave sleep is intriguing, since reductions in slow-wave sleep have frequently been reported in fibromyalgia and general anxiety disorder.

      [b]Basically while benzos makes shut-eye easier, sleep quality goes down the toilet. Lyrica does the opposite.

      Now to answer your question are there other substances that has similiar effect on sleep quality ?[/b]

      Yes, option A = Gabitril (Tiababine) :

      Pilot study of lorazepam and tiagabine effects on sleep, motor learning, and impulsivity in cocaine abstinence.Morgan PT, Malison RT.
      Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine and Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, Connecticut 06519, USA. [email]peter.morgan@yale.edu[/email]

      OBJECTIVES: To test the effects of mechanistically different GABA modulating agents on the disrupted sleep and cognitive function associated with abstinence from cocaine. METHODS: We examined the effects of lorazepam and tiagabine on polysomnographically measured sleep and cognition in six cocaine dependent persons. Participants were studied during the first and second week of controlled abstinence following intravenous, laboratory cocaine administration. RESULTS: Lorazepam and tiagabine decreased sleep latency, but whereas lorazepam markedly increased light sleep, tiagabine caused a dramatic shift toward slow-wave sleep. Despite increasing total sleep time, lorazepam impaired sleep dependent learning and increased next day impulsivity. CONCLUSIONS: These results introduce the possibility of different, sleep-related cognitive effects of mechanistically distinct GABAergic sedative hypnotics.

      Option B = Neurontin (Gabapentin) :

      Gabapentin increases slow-wave sleep in normal adults.Foldvary-Schaefer N, De Leon Sanchez I, Karafa M, Mascha E, Dinner D, Morris HH.
      Department of Neurology, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44195, USA. [email]foldvan@ccf.org[/email]

      PURPOSE: The older antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have a variety of effects on sleep, including marked reduction in rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, slow-wave sleep (SWS), and sleep latency, and an increase in light sleep. The effects of the newer AEDs on sleep are unknown. Our purpose was to study the effect of gabapentin (GBP) on sleep. METHODS: Ten healthy adults and nine controls were the subjects of this study. All underwent baseline and follow-up polysomnography (PSG) and completed sleep questionnaires. After baseline, the treated group received GBP titrated to 1,800 mg daily. Polygraphic variables and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) scores, a subjective measure of sleep propensity, were compared by using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. RESULTS: Nine of the treated subjects achieved the target dose; one was studied with 1,500 mg daily because of dizziness experienced at the higher dose. GBP-treated subjects had an increase in SWS compared with baseline. No difference in the ESS or other polygraphic variables was observed. However, a minor reduction in arousals, awakenings, and stage shifts was observed in treated subjects. CONCLUSIONS: GBP appears to be less disruptive to sleep than are some of the older AEDs. These findings may underlie the drug’s therapeutic effect in the treatment of disorders associated with sleep disruption.

      So you got Lyrica, Neurontin and Gabitril. Not sure about short-and long term safety though, there are reports of seizures and other side-effects in non-epileptics.

      Great post! thanks for the reply.

      #788877

      Anonymous
      QUOTE (avantgarde @ Jul 10 2009, 02:00 AM) [url=”index.php?act=findpost&pid=558987″][/url]
      I had the same experience and I belive Necrosis noted this as well.

      After doing some digging it appears that Lyrica enchanches nonrapid eye movement sleep and decreases rapid eye movement sleep.
      Along these lines Pregabalin induces dose-dependent increases in relative delta power after administration (link to a nifty study).

      [url=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11714899?ordinalpos=72&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum”]http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1171489…Pubmed_RVDocSum[/url]

      So why is this a big deal ?

      The deepest stage of non-REM (NREM) sleep, characterized by a larger amount of synchronized slow-wave EEG (brainwave activity) than in other stages. These slow waves are called delta activity. During slow-wave sleep (SWS) the brain becomes less responsive to external stimuli; it is considered the deepest sleep as it is the hardest stage from which to awaken.

      Basically SWS appears to be very important for the restorative effects of sleep, check out the sections in the Wikipedia article, especially under Restoration, anabolic and memory processing :

      [url=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#cite_note-31″]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#cite_note-31[/url]

      So how does Lyrica differ from classical sedatives eg benzos ?

      A double-blind study in healthy volunteers to assess the effects on sleep of pregabalin compared with alprazolam and placebo.Hindmarch I, Dawson J, Stanley N.
      HPRU Medical Research Centre, University of Surrey, School of Biomedical & Molecular Sciences, Egerton Road, Guildford, UK.

      STUDY OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of pregabalin compared with alprazolam and placebo on aspects of sleep in healthy volunteers. DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled, 3-way crossover. SETTING: Single research center. PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: Healthy adult (12 men) volunteers (N=24) received oral pregabalin 150 mg t.i.d., alprazolam 1 mg t.i.d., and placebo t.i.d. for 3 days. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Objective sleep was measured by an 8-channel polysomnograph; subjective sleep was measured using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire. Compared with placebo, pregabalin significantly increased slow-wave sleep both as a proportion of the total sleep period and the duration of stage 4 sleep. Alprazolam significantly reduced slow-wave sleep. Pregabalin and alprazolam produced modest, but significant, reductions in sleep-onset latency compared with placebo. Rapid eye movement sleep latency after pregabalin was no different than placebo but was significantly shorter than that found with alprazolam. Although there were no differences between the active treatments, both pregabalin and alprazolam reduced rapid eye movement sleep as a proportion of the total sleep period compared with placebo. Pregabalin also significantly reduced the number of awakenings of more than 1 minute in duration. Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire ratings of the ease of getting to sleep and the perceived quality of sleep were significantly improved following both active treatments, and ratings of behavior following awakening were significantly impaired by both drug treatments. CONCLUSIONS:Pregabalin appears to have an effect on sleep and sleep architecture that distinguishes it from benzodiazepines. Enhancement of slow-wave sleep is intriguing, since reductions in slow-wave sleep have frequently been reported in fibromyalgia and general anxiety disorder.

      [b]Basically while benzos makes shut-eye easier, sleep quality goes down the toilet. Lyrica does the opposite.

      Now to answer your question are there other substances that has similiar effect on sleep quality ?[/b]

      Yes, option A = Gabitril (Tiababine) :

      Pilot study of lorazepam and tiagabine effects on sleep, motor learning, and impulsivity in cocaine abstinence.Morgan PT, Malison RT.
      Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine and Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, Connecticut 06519, USA. [email]peter.morgan@yale.edu[/email]

      OBJECTIVES: To test the effects of mechanistically different GABA modulating agents on the disrupted sleep and cognitive function associated with abstinence from cocaine. METHODS: We examined the effects of lorazepam and tiagabine on polysomnographically measured sleep and cognition in six cocaine dependent persons. Participants were studied during the first and second week of controlled abstinence following intravenous, laboratory cocaine administration. RESULTS: Lorazepam and tiagabine decreased sleep latency, but whereas lorazepam markedly increased light sleep, tiagabine caused a dramatic shift toward slow-wave sleep. Despite increasing total sleep time, lorazepam impaired sleep dependent learning and increased next day impulsivity. CONCLUSIONS: These results introduce the possibility of different, sleep-related cognitive effects of mechanistically distinct GABAergic sedative hypnotics.

      Option B = Neurontin (Gabapentin) :

      Gabapentin increases slow-wave sleep in normal adults.Foldvary-Schaefer N, De Leon Sanchez I, Karafa M, Mascha E, Dinner D, Morris HH.
      Department of Neurology, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44195, USA. [email]foldvan@ccf.org[/email]

      PURPOSE: The older antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have a variety of effects on sleep, including marked reduction in rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, slow-wave sleep (SWS), and sleep latency, and an increase in light sleep. The effects of the newer AEDs on sleep are unknown. Our purpose was to study the effect of gabapentin (GBP) on sleep. METHODS: Ten healthy adults and nine controls were the subjects of this study. All underwent baseline and follow-up polysomnography (PSG) and completed sleep questionnaires. After baseline, the treated group received GBP titrated to 1,800 mg daily. Polygraphic variables and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) scores, a subjective measure of sleep propensity, were compared by using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. RESULTS: Nine of the treated subjects achieved the target dose; one was studied with 1,500 mg daily because of dizziness experienced at the higher dose. GBP-treated subjects had an increase in SWS compared with baseline. No difference in the ESS or other polygraphic variables was observed. However, a minor reduction in arousals, awakenings, and stage shifts was observed in treated subjects. CONCLUSIONS: GBP appears to be less disruptive to sleep than are some of the older AEDs. These findings may underlie the drug’s therapeutic effect in the treatment of disorders associated with sleep disruption.

      So you got Lyrica, Neurontin and Gabitril. Not sure about short-and long term safety though, there are reports of seizures and other side-effects in non-epileptics.

      Great post! thanks for the reply.

      #788878

      Anonymous
      QUOTE (avantgarde @ Jul 10 2009, 02:00 AM) [url=”index.php?act=findpost&pid=558987″][/url]
      I had the same experience and I belive Necrosis noted this as well.

      After doing some digging it appears that Lyrica enchanches nonrapid eye movement sleep and decreases rapid eye movement sleep.
      Along these lines Pregabalin induces dose-dependent increases in relative delta power after administration (link to a nifty study).

      [url=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11714899?ordinalpos=72&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum”]http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1171489…Pubmed_RVDocSum[/url]

      So why is this a big deal ?

      The deepest stage of non-REM (NREM) sleep, characterized by a larger amount of synchronized slow-wave EEG (brainwave activity) than in other stages. These slow waves are called delta activity. During slow-wave sleep (SWS) the brain becomes less responsive to external stimuli; it is considered the deepest sleep as it is the hardest stage from which to awaken.

      Basically SWS appears to be very important for the restorative effects of sleep, check out the sections in the Wikipedia article, especially under Restoration, anabolic and memory processing :

      [url=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#cite_note-31″]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#cite_note-31[/url]

      So how does Lyrica differ from classical sedatives eg benzos ?

      A double-blind study in healthy volunteers to assess the effects on sleep of pregabalin compared with alprazolam and placebo.Hindmarch I, Dawson J, Stanley N.
      HPRU Medical Research Centre, University of Surrey, School of Biomedical & Molecular Sciences, Egerton Road, Guildford, UK.

      STUDY OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of pregabalin compared with alprazolam and placebo on aspects of sleep in healthy volunteers. DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled, 3-way crossover. SETTING: Single research center. PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: Healthy adult (12 men) volunteers (N=24) received oral pregabalin 150 mg t.i.d., alprazolam 1 mg t.i.d., and placebo t.i.d. for 3 days. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Objective sleep was measured by an 8-channel polysomnograph; subjective sleep was measured using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire. Compared with placebo, pregabalin significantly increased slow-wave sleep both as a proportion of the total sleep period and the duration of stage 4 sleep. Alprazolam significantly reduced slow-wave sleep. Pregabalin and alprazolam produced modest, but significant, reductions in sleep-onset latency compared with placebo. Rapid eye movement sleep latency after pregabalin was no different than placebo but was significantly shorter than that found with alprazolam. Although there were no differences between the active treatments, both pregabalin and alprazolam reduced rapid eye movement sleep as a proportion of the total sleep period compared with placebo. Pregabalin also significantly reduced the number of awakenings of more than 1 minute in duration. Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire ratings of the ease of getting to sleep and the perceived quality of sleep were significantly improved following both active treatments, and ratings of behavior following awakening were significantly impaired by both drug treatments. CONCLUSIONS:Pregabalin appears to have an effect on sleep and sleep architecture that distinguishes it from benzodiazepines. Enhancement of slow-wave sleep is intriguing, since reductions in slow-wave sleep have frequently been reported in fibromyalgia and general anxiety disorder.

      [b]Basically while benzos makes shut-eye easier, sleep quality goes down the toilet. Lyrica does the opposite.

      Now to answer your question are there other substances that has similiar effect on sleep quality ?[/b]

      Yes, option A = Gabitril (Tiababine) :

      Pilot study of lorazepam and tiagabine effects on sleep, motor learning, and impulsivity in cocaine abstinence.Morgan PT, Malison RT.
      Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine and Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, Connecticut 06519, USA. [email]peter.morgan@yale.edu[/email]

      OBJECTIVES: To test the effects of mechanistically different GABA modulating agents on the disrupted sleep and cognitive function associated with abstinence from cocaine. METHODS: We examined the effects of lorazepam and tiagabine on polysomnographically measured sleep and cognition in six cocaine dependent persons. Participants were studied during the first and second week of controlled abstinence following intravenous, laboratory cocaine administration. RESULTS: Lorazepam and tiagabine decreased sleep latency, but whereas lorazepam markedly increased light sleep, tiagabine caused a dramatic shift toward slow-wave sleep. Despite increasing total sleep time, lorazepam impaired sleep dependent learning and increased next day impulsivity. CONCLUSIONS: These results introduce the possibility of different, sleep-related cognitive effects of mechanistically distinct GABAergic sedative hypnotics.

      Option B = Neurontin (Gabapentin) :

      Gabapentin increases slow-wave sleep in normal adults.Foldvary-Schaefer N, De Leon Sanchez I, Karafa M, Mascha E, Dinner D, Morris HH.
      Department of Neurology, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44195, USA. [email]foldvan@ccf.org[/email]

      PURPOSE: The older antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have a variety of effects on sleep, including marked reduction in rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, slow-wave sleep (SWS), and sleep latency, and an increase in light sleep. The effects of the newer AEDs on sleep are unknown. Our purpose was to study the effect of gabapentin (GBP) on sleep. METHODS: Ten healthy adults and nine controls were the subjects of this study. All underwent baseline and follow-up polysomnography (PSG) and completed sleep questionnaires. After baseline, the treated group received GBP titrated to 1,800 mg daily. Polygraphic variables and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) scores, a subjective measure of sleep propensity, were compared by using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. RESULTS: Nine of the treated subjects achieved the target dose; one was studied with 1,500 mg daily because of dizziness experienced at the higher dose. GBP-treated subjects had an increase in SWS compared with baseline. No difference in the ESS or other polygraphic variables was observed. However, a minor reduction in arousals, awakenings, and stage shifts was observed in treated subjects. CONCLUSIONS: GBP appears to be less disruptive to sleep than are some of the older AEDs. These findings may underlie the drug’s therapeutic effect in the treatment of disorders associated with sleep disruption.

      So you got Lyrica, Neurontin and Gabitril. Not sure about short-and long term safety though, there are reports of seizures and other side-effects in non-epileptics.

      Great post! thanks for the reply.

      #788879

      Anonymous
      QUOTE (avantgarde @ Jul 10 2009, 02:00 AM) [url=”index.php?act=findpost&pid=558987″][/url]
      I had the same experience and I belive Necrosis noted this as well.

      After doing some digging it appears that Lyrica enchanches nonrapid eye movement sleep and decreases rapid eye movement sleep.
      Along these lines Pregabalin induces dose-dependent increases in relative delta power after administration (link to a nifty study).

      [url=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11714899?ordinalpos=72&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum”]http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1171489…Pubmed_RVDocSum[/url]

      So why is this a big deal ?

      The deepest stage of non-REM (NREM) sleep, characterized by a larger amount of synchronized slow-wave EEG (brainwave activity) than in other stages. These slow waves are called delta activity. During slow-wave sleep (SWS) the brain becomes less responsive to external stimuli; it is considered the deepest sleep as it is the hardest stage from which to awaken.

      Basically SWS appears to be very important for the restorative effects of sleep, check out the sections in the Wikipedia article, especially under Restoration, anabolic and memory processing :

      [url=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#cite_note-31″]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#cite_note-31[/url]

      So how does Lyrica differ from classical sedatives eg benzos ?

      A double-blind study in healthy volunteers to assess the effects on sleep of pregabalin compared with alprazolam and placebo.Hindmarch I, Dawson J, Stanley N.
      HPRU Medical Research Centre, University of Surrey, School of Biomedical & Molecular Sciences, Egerton Road, Guildford, UK.

      STUDY OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of pregabalin compared with alprazolam and placebo on aspects of sleep in healthy volunteers. DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled, 3-way crossover. SETTING: Single research center. PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: Healthy adult (12 men) volunteers (N=24) received oral pregabalin 150 mg t.i.d., alprazolam 1 mg t.i.d., and placebo t.i.d. for 3 days. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Objective sleep was measured by an 8-channel polysomnograph; subjective sleep was measured using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire. Compared with placebo, pregabalin significantly increased slow-wave sleep both as a proportion of the total sleep period and the duration of stage 4 sleep. Alprazolam significantly reduced slow-wave sleep. Pregabalin and alprazolam produced modest, but significant, reductions in sleep-onset latency compared with placebo. Rapid eye movement sleep latency after pregabalin was no different than placebo but was significantly shorter than that found with alprazolam. Although there were no differences between the active treatments, both pregabalin and alprazolam reduced rapid eye movement sleep as a proportion of the total sleep period compared with placebo. Pregabalin also significantly reduced the number of awakenings of more than 1 minute in duration. Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire ratings of the ease of getting to sleep and the perceived quality of sleep were significantly improved following both active treatments, and ratings of behavior following awakening were significantly impaired by both drug treatments. CONCLUSIONS:Pregabalin appears to have an effect on sleep and sleep architecture that distinguishes it from benzodiazepines. Enhancement of slow-wave sleep is intriguing, since reductions in slow-wave sleep have frequently been reported in fibromyalgia and general anxiety disorder.

      [b]Basically while benzos makes shut-eye easier, sleep quality goes down the toilet. Lyrica does the opposite.

      Now to answer your question are there other substances that has similiar effect on sleep quality ?[/b]

      Yes, option A = Gabitril (Tiababine) :

      Pilot study of lorazepam and tiagabine effects on sleep, motor learning, and impulsivity in cocaine abstinence.Morgan PT, Malison RT.
      Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine and Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, Connecticut 06519, USA. [email]peter.morgan@yale.edu[/email]

      OBJECTIVES: To test the effects of mechanistically different GABA modulating agents on the disrupted sleep and cognitive function associated with abstinence from cocaine. METHODS: We examined the effects of lorazepam and tiagabine on polysomnographically measured sleep and cognition in six cocaine dependent persons. Participants were studied during the first and second week of controlled abstinence following intravenous, laboratory cocaine administration. RESULTS: Lorazepam and tiagabine decreased sleep latency, but whereas lorazepam markedly increased light sleep, tiagabine caused a dramatic shift toward slow-wave sleep. Despite increasing total sleep time, lorazepam impaired sleep dependent learning and increased next day impulsivity. CONCLUSIONS: These results introduce the possibility of different, sleep-related cognitive effects of mechanistically distinct GABAergic sedative hypnotics.

      Option B = Neurontin (Gabapentin) :

      Gabapentin increases slow-wave sleep in normal adults.Foldvary-Schaefer N, De Leon Sanchez I, Karafa M, Mascha E, Dinner D, Morris HH.
      Department of Neurology, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44195, USA. [email]foldvan@ccf.org[/email]

      PURPOSE: The older antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have a variety of effects on sleep, including marked reduction in rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, slow-wave sleep (SWS), and sleep latency, and an increase in light sleep. The effects of the newer AEDs on sleep are unknown. Our purpose was to study the effect of gabapentin (GBP) on sleep. METHODS: Ten healthy adults and nine controls were the subjects of this study. All underwent baseline and follow-up polysomnography (PSG) and completed sleep questionnaires. After baseline, the treated group received GBP titrated to 1,800 mg daily. Polygraphic variables and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) scores, a subjective measure of sleep propensity, were compared by using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. RESULTS: Nine of the treated subjects achieved the target dose; one was studied with 1,500 mg daily because of dizziness experienced at the higher dose. GBP-treated subjects had an increase in SWS compared with baseline. No difference in the ESS or other polygraphic variables was observed. However, a minor reduction in arousals, awakenings, and stage shifts was observed in treated subjects. CONCLUSIONS: GBP appears to be less disruptive to sleep than are some of the older AEDs. These findings may underlie the drug’s therapeutic effect in the treatment of disorders associated with sleep disruption.

      So you got Lyrica, Neurontin and Gabitril. Not sure about short-and long term safety though, there are reports of seizures and other side-effects in non-epileptics.

      Great post! thanks for the reply.

      #788880

      Anonymous
      QUOTE (avantgarde @ Jul 10 2009, 02:00 AM) [url=”index.php?act=findpost&pid=558987″][/url]
      I had the same experience and I belive Necrosis noted this as well.

      After doing some digging it appears that Lyrica enchanches nonrapid eye movement sleep and decreases rapid eye movement sleep.
      Along these lines Pregabalin induces dose-dependent increases in relative delta power after administration (link to a nifty study).

      [url=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11714899?ordinalpos=72&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum”]http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1171489…Pubmed_RVDocSum[/url]

      So why is this a big deal ?

      The deepest stage of non-REM (NREM) sleep, characterized by a larger amount of synchronized slow-wave EEG (brainwave activity) than in other stages. These slow waves are called delta activity. During slow-wave sleep (SWS) the brain becomes less responsive to external stimuli; it is considered the deepest sleep as it is the hardest stage from which to awaken.

      Basically SWS appears to be very important for the restorative effects of sleep, check out the sections in the Wikipedia article, especially under Restoration, anabolic and memory processing :

      [url=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#cite_note-31″]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#cite_note-31[/url]

      So how does Lyrica differ from classical sedatives eg benzos ?

      A double-blind study in healthy volunteers to assess the effects on sleep of pregabalin compared with alprazolam and placebo.Hindmarch I, Dawson J, Stanley N.
      HPRU Medical Research Centre, University of Surrey, School of Biomedical & Molecular Sciences, Egerton Road, Guildford, UK.

      STUDY OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of pregabalin compared with alprazolam and placebo on aspects of sleep in healthy volunteers. DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled, 3-way crossover. SETTING: Single research center. PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: Healthy adult (12 men) volunteers (N=24) received oral pregabalin 150 mg t.i.d., alprazolam 1 mg t.i.d., and placebo t.i.d. for 3 days. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Objective sleep was measured by an 8-channel polysomnograph; subjective sleep was measured using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire. Compared with placebo, pregabalin significantly increased slow-wave sleep both as a proportion of the total sleep period and the duration of stage 4 sleep. Alprazolam significantly reduced slow-wave sleep. Pregabalin and alprazolam produced modest, but significant, reductions in sleep-onset latency compared with placebo. Rapid eye movement sleep latency after pregabalin was no different than placebo but was significantly shorter than that found with alprazolam. Although there were no differences between the active treatments, both pregabalin and alprazolam reduced rapid eye movement sleep as a proportion of the total sleep period compared with placebo. Pregabalin also significantly reduced the number of awakenings of more than 1 minute in duration. Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire ratings of the ease of getting to sleep and the perceived quality of sleep were significantly improved following both active treatments, and ratings of behavior following awakening were significantly impaired by both drug treatments. CONCLUSIONS:Pregabalin appears to have an effect on sleep and sleep architecture that distinguishes it from benzodiazepines. Enhancement of slow-wave sleep is intriguing, since reductions in slow-wave sleep have frequently been reported in fibromyalgia and general anxiety disorder.

      [b]Basically while benzos makes shut-eye easier, sleep quality goes down the toilet. Lyrica does the opposite.

      Now to answer your question are there other substances that has similiar effect on sleep quality ?[/b]

      Yes, option A = Gabitril (Tiababine) :

      Pilot study of lorazepam and tiagabine effects on sleep, motor learning, and impulsivity in cocaine abstinence.Morgan PT, Malison RT.
      Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine and Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, Connecticut 06519, USA. [email]peter.morgan@yale.edu[/email]

      OBJECTIVES: To test the effects of mechanistically different GABA modulating agents on the disrupted sleep and cognitive function associated with abstinence from cocaine. METHODS: We examined the effects of lorazepam and tiagabine on polysomnographically measured sleep and cognition in six cocaine dependent persons. Participants were studied during the first and second week of controlled abstinence following intravenous, laboratory cocaine administration. RESULTS: Lorazepam and tiagabine decreased sleep latency, but whereas lorazepam markedly increased light sleep, tiagabine caused a dramatic shift toward slow-wave sleep. Despite increasing total sleep time, lorazepam impaired sleep dependent learning and increased next day impulsivity. CONCLUSIONS: These results introduce the possibility of different, sleep-related cognitive effects of mechanistically distinct GABAergic sedative hypnotics.

      Option B = Neurontin (Gabapentin) :

      Gabapentin increases slow-wave sleep in normal adults.Foldvary-Schaefer N, De Leon Sanchez I, Karafa M, Mascha E, Dinner D, Morris HH.
      Department of Neurology, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44195, USA. [email]foldvan@ccf.org[/email]

      PURPOSE: The older antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have a variety of effects on sleep, including marked reduction in rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, slow-wave sleep (SWS), and sleep latency, and an increase in light sleep. The effects of the newer AEDs on sleep are unknown. Our purpose was to study the effect of gabapentin (GBP) on sleep. METHODS: Ten healthy adults and nine controls were the subjects of this study. All underwent baseline and follow-up polysomnography (PSG) and completed sleep questionnaires. After baseline, the treated group received GBP titrated to 1,800 mg daily. Polygraphic variables and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) scores, a subjective measure of sleep propensity, were compared by using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. RESULTS: Nine of the treated subjects achieved the target dose; one was studied with 1,500 mg daily because of dizziness experienced at the higher dose. GBP-treated subjects had an increase in SWS compared with baseline. No difference in the ESS or other polygraphic variables was observed. However, a minor reduction in arousals, awakenings, and stage shifts was observed in treated subjects. CONCLUSIONS: GBP appears to be less disruptive to sleep than are some of the older AEDs. These findings may underlie the drug’s therapeutic effect in the treatment of disorders associated with sleep disruption.

      So you got Lyrica, Neurontin and Gabitril. Not sure about short-and long term safety though, there are reports of seizures and other side-effects in non-epileptics.

      Great post! thanks for the reply.

      #789567

      Anonymous

      Anyone used it long-term who can comment on the significance of tolerance to a sleep-enhancing effect? (or lack thereof, though this seems rather rare for even atypical GABAnergics)

      #789568

      Anonymous

      Anyone used it long-term who can comment on the significance of tolerance to a sleep-enhancing effect? (or lack thereof, though this seems rather rare for even atypical GABAnergics)

      #789569

      Anonymous

      Anyone used it long-term who can comment on the significance of tolerance to a sleep-enhancing effect? (or lack thereof, though this seems rather rare for even atypical GABAnergics)

      #789570

      Anonymous

      Anyone used it long-term who can comment on the significance of tolerance to a sleep-enhancing effect? (or lack thereof, though this seems rather rare for even atypical GABAnergics)

      #789571

      Anonymous

      Anyone used it long-term who can comment on the significance of tolerance to a sleep-enhancing effect? (or lack thereof, though this seems rather rare for even atypical GABAnergics)

      #789612

      Anonymous

      havent used it long term, but me and my missus have been regularly using the stuff for recreational purposes for nearly 3 years now, sometimes consuming over 1g in a session each (mind you a session can last nearly 48 hours). Tolerance with recreational doses rises fairly quickly, to the point that seems to stop working by the end of the second day and it takes about a week for most of it to fall and maybe 2 weeks to return to zero. Lyrica does do wanders for sleep though, it can effectively cancel any recreational stimulant out to allow you to sleep where it would had been near impossible without it. I can sleep for 3-4 hours with lyrica and wake up completely refreshed as if i slept a full nights sleep.

      #789613

      Anonymous

      havent used it long term, but me and my missus have been regularly using the stuff for recreational purposes for nearly 3 years now, sometimes consuming over 1g in a session each (mind you a session can last nearly 48 hours). Tolerance with recreational doses rises fairly quickly, to the point that seems to stop working by the end of the second day and it takes about a week for most of it to fall and maybe 2 weeks to return to zero. Lyrica does do wanders for sleep though, it can effectively cancel any recreational stimulant out to allow you to sleep where it would had been near impossible without it. I can sleep for 3-4 hours with lyrica and wake up completely refreshed as if i slept a full nights sleep.

      #789614

      Anonymous

      havent used it long term, but me and my missus have been regularly using the stuff for recreational purposes for nearly 3 years now, sometimes consuming over 1g in a session each (mind you a session can last nearly 48 hours). Tolerance with recreational doses rises fairly quickly, to the point that seems to stop working by the end of the second day and it takes about a week for most of it to fall and maybe 2 weeks to return to zero. Lyrica does do wanders for sleep though, it can effectively cancel any recreational stimulant out to allow you to sleep where it would had been near impossible without it. I can sleep for 3-4 hours with lyrica and wake up completely refreshed as if i slept a full nights sleep.

      #789615

      Anonymous

      havent used it long term, but me and my missus have been regularly using the stuff for recreational purposes for nearly 3 years now, sometimes consuming over 1g in a session each (mind you a session can last nearly 48 hours). Tolerance with recreational doses rises fairly quickly, to the point that seems to stop working by the end of the second day and it takes about a week for most of it to fall and maybe 2 weeks to return to zero. Lyrica does do wanders for sleep though, it can effectively cancel any recreational stimulant out to allow you to sleep where it would had been near impossible without it. I can sleep for 3-4 hours with lyrica and wake up completely refreshed as if i slept a full nights sleep.

      #789616

      Anonymous

      havent used it long term, but me and my missus have been regularly using the stuff for recreational purposes for nearly 3 years now, sometimes consuming over 1g in a session each (mind you a session can last nearly 48 hours). Tolerance with recreational doses rises fairly quickly, to the point that seems to stop working by the end of the second day and it takes about a week for most of it to fall and maybe 2 weeks to return to zero. Lyrica does do wanders for sleep though, it can effectively cancel any recreational stimulant out to allow you to sleep where it would had been near impossible without it. I can sleep for 3-4 hours with lyrica and wake up completely refreshed as if i slept a full nights sleep.

      #790882

      Anonymous
      QUOTE (graatch @ Jul 13 2009, 09:25 PM) [url=”index.php?act=findpost&pid=559413″][/url]
      Anyone used it long-term who can comment on the significance of tolerance to a sleep-enhancing effect? (or lack thereof, though this seems rather rare for even atypical GABAnergics)

      I have and just got back on it. I started using it back in 2006 and loved it. But, used it solo. The only problem I had was being tired everyday. Which is why I added Wellbutrin to the mix. It works wonders and so far I love it.

      Sleep: I sleep probably 2-3 hours on it, then I wake up. And it is hard to go back to sleep after that. Which is why I am up at 4am and playing on the internet! I use Lyrica 150mgs 3 times a day, and Wellbutrin SR 150mg 2 times a day. But the sleep is very restful and I feel refreshed on a very limited amount of sleep. I love it.

      tripp

      #790883

      Anonymous
      QUOTE (graatch @ Jul 13 2009, 09:25 PM) [url=”index.php?act=findpost&pid=559413″][/url]
      Anyone used it long-term who can comment on the significance of tolerance to a sleep-enhancing effect? (or lack thereof, though this seems rather rare for even atypical GABAnergics)

      I have and just got back on it. I started using it back in 2006 and loved it. But, used it solo. The only problem I had was being tired everyday. Which is why I added Wellbutrin to the mix. It works wonders and so far I love it.

      Sleep: I sleep probably 2-3 hours on it, then I wake up. And it is hard to go back to sleep after that. Which is why I am up at 4am and playing on the internet! I use Lyrica 150mgs 3 times a day, and Wellbutrin SR 150mg 2 times a day. But the sleep is very restful and I feel refreshed on a very limited amount of sleep. I love it.

      tripp

      #790884

      Anonymous
      QUOTE (graatch @ Jul 13 2009, 09:25 PM) [url=”index.php?act=findpost&pid=559413″][/url]
      Anyone used it long-term who can comment on the significance of tolerance to a sleep-enhancing effect? (or lack thereof, though this seems rather rare for even atypical GABAnergics)

      I have and just got back on it. I started using it back in 2006 and loved it. But, used it solo. The only problem I had was being tired everyday. Which is why I added Wellbutrin to the mix. It works wonders and so far I love it.

      Sleep: I sleep probably 2-3 hours on it, then I wake up. And it is hard to go back to sleep after that. Which is why I am up at 4am and playing on the internet! I use Lyrica 150mgs 3 times a day, and Wellbutrin SR 150mg 2 times a day. But the sleep is very restful and I feel refreshed on a very limited amount of sleep. I love it.

      tripp

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