• Nutrigenomics article excerpt about Coffee

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    • #619623

      Here’s the [url=”http://www.t-nation.com/readArticle.do;jsessionid=2ECF887B4C237BEFFA98A38C1CD51E77.hydra?id=1885110″]LINK[/url] to the full interview. Its a great read, I’d recommend y’all give it a once over.

      JB mentioned this topic breifly in the upcoming M&M interview, its really a fascinating subject, how peoples genetic coding can account for so much of the conflicting research and response to specific diets/supplements.

      #619624

      Here’s the [url=”http://www.t-nation.com/readArticle.do;jsessionid=2ECF887B4C237BEFFA98A38C1CD51E77.hydra?id=1885110″]LINK[/url] to the full interview. Its a great read, I’d recommend y’all give it a once over.

      JB mentioned this topic breifly in the upcoming M&M interview, its really a fascinating subject, how peoples genetic coding can account for so much of the conflicting research and response to specific diets/supplements.

      #637346

      Anonymous

      A good book on this subject of biochemical individuality is Biochemical individuality by Roger Williams.

      [url=”http://www.amazon.com/Biochemical-Individuality-Roger-Williams/dp/0879838930/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1203843623&sr=8-1″]http://www.amazon.com/Biochemical-Individu…3623&sr=8-1[/url]

      There are a ton of variations in various organ systems and things related to metabolism.

      #637347

      Anonymous

      A good book on this subject of biochemical individuality is Biochemical individuality by Roger Williams.

      [url=”http://www.amazon.com/Biochemical-Individuality-Roger-Williams/dp/0879838930/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1203843623&sr=8-1″]http://www.amazon.com/Biochemical-Individu…3623&sr=8-1[/url]

      There are a ton of variations in various organ systems and things related to metabolism.

      #637352

      Anonymous

      Nice. I just read this interview earlier this week.

      Does anyone else have any recommendations of worthwhile books re:Nutrigenomics?

      #637353

      Anonymous

      Nice. I just read this interview earlier this week.

      Does anyone else have any recommendations of worthwhile books re:Nutrigenomics?

      #637368

      Anonymous

      Books may be premature. Look for research papers as the fields are relatively new.

      BTW, please note the differences in nutritional genomics:

      Nutrigenomics = gene expressions from nutrients

      Nutrigenetics = individual genetic variations on responses to diet

      This will give you a good introduction (80+ pages of research review): [url=”http://content.karger.com/ProdukteDB/produkte.asp?Aktion=ShowPDF&ArtikelNr=109814&Ausgabe=234106&ProduktNr=232009&filename=109814.pdf”]http://content.karger.com/ProdukteDB/produ…name=109814.pdf[/url]

      #637369

      Anonymous

      Books may be premature. Look for research papers as the fields are relatively new.

      BTW, please note the differences in nutritional genomics:

      Nutrigenomics = gene expressions from nutrients

      Nutrigenetics = individual genetic variations on responses to diet

      This will give you a good introduction (80+ pages of research review): [url=”http://content.karger.com/ProdukteDB/produkte.asp?Aktion=ShowPDF&ArtikelNr=109814&Ausgabe=234106&ProduktNr=232009&filename=109814.pdf”]http://content.karger.com/ProdukteDB/produ…name=109814.pdf[/url]

      #637415

      Anonymous

      Much appreciated. Thanks.

      #637416

      Anonymous

      Much appreciated. Thanks.

      #637417

      Anonymous

      Much appreciated. Thanks.

      #26650

      Dr. El-Sohemy: Last year, we published a study in the [i]Journal of the American Medical Association[/i] to demonstrate that in some individuals, caffeinated coffee intake lowered the risk of heart attacks. But in other individuals the same dose of caffeinated coffee [i]increased[/i] the risk of heart attacks.

      Berardi: Let me guess. It had to do with the genes.

      Dr. El-Sohemy: That’s right. Individuals who had what we call a ‘slow’ version of the gene CYP1A2 (a gene that breaks down caffeine in the liver) have an increased risk of a heart attack when increasing consumption of caffeinated coffee.

      However, those who have the ‘fast’ version of CYP1A2, have a [i]lower[/i] risk of heart attacks with moderate intakes of caffeinated coffee (1-3 cups per day).

      Berardi: How do people make sense of this dichotomy?

      Dr. El-Sohemy: These findings suggest that caffeinated coffee only increases heart disease in those who have a limited capacity to break down caffeine.

      The reason why those with the ‘fast’ version of the gene might benefit is because they can break down caffeine very rapidly, getting rid of the caffeine while preserving the “healthy” antioxidants in the coffee. It’s these antioxidants, not the caffeine, which might offer protection for the heart.

      So, in the end, caffeine itself probably isn’t good for anyone in terms of heart disease. But, if you can get rid of it quickly because you’re a ‘fast’ metabolizer of caffeine, then you might benefit from the other compounds in either coffee or tea, both of which are pretty good sources of antioxidants.

      [img]http://www.t-nation.com/img/photos/2008/08-007-diet/image022.jpg[/img]

      By the way, being a ‘fast’ metabolizer for caffeine doesn’t necessarily make you a ‘fast’ metabolizer of any other dietary factor. The enzymes coded by each gene are quite specific to the compounds they metabolize.

      Berardi: Unfortunately for me, I don’t know my CYP1A2 genotype, but I do love an occasional cup of espresso! How can I know if I’m playing Russian roulette with my health every time I brew up a pot of java?

      Dr. El-Sohemy: Some people think they know they’re ‘slow’ metabolizers of caffeine because if they have a coffee in the afternoon, it’ll keep them up all night. But this just means that caffeine binds more effectively to a specific receptor in the nervous system, which is how caffeine acts as a stimulant.

      It doesn’t tell you anything about how quickly caffeine is broken down by the liver, which is the main organ that’s responsible for metabolizing caffeine. The only way to know if you’re a’ fast’ or ‘slow’ caffeine metabolizer is by having a DNA test.

      [img]http://www.t-nation.com/img/photos/2008/08-007-diet/image025.jpg[/img] [center]

      “Mike, you are [i]not[/i] a slow caffeine metabolizer.”[/center]

      My lab routinely runs these genetic tests using cells that are easily obtained by swabbing the inside of your mouth. Although this is done primarily for research purposes and for health care practitioners, we’re also trying to develop a test that doesn’t require the use of elaborate equipment needed to process and analyze DNA.

      Berardi: Aren’t some progressive health centers doing this type of genetic testing for patients? If so, any recommendations?

      Dr. El-Sohemy: I’ve heard about a company that claims to offer the CYP1A2 test based on our published study, but I can’t really comment on how reliable their test is. They haven’t done the research that we have.

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