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strong guy lifting plateVinpocetine is ethyl-apovincaminate, which is known as the drugs Cavinton and Intelectol. In the U.S., vinpocetine is available over the counter. Vinpocetine is considered a nootropic, or something that enhances cognitive ability. Vinpocetine is a derivative of vincamine, which comes from the Vinca Minor (lesser periwinkle) plant.

Vinpocetine works by enhancing blood flow to the brain, increasing oxygen flow to the brain, and increasing glucose delivery and uptake in the brain. This should result in improved cognitive ability including increased memory ablilty and an immediate increase in focus and mental energy. Research has indicated that vinpocetine may be useful in treating conditions such as depression, dementia, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Vinpocetine may be found in supplements for focus or memory, and may also be found in fat burners for its ability to increase blood flow which may aid in the transportation of fatty acids to be burned as energy. Vinpocetine may also be purchased as a single ingredient in capsules or tablets.

References

1. Vereczkey L, Czira G, Tamas J, Szentirmay Z, Botar Z, & Szporny L. (1979). Pharmacokinetics of vinpocetine in humans. Arzneimittel-Forschung. 29(6), 957-60.

2. Balestreri R, Fontana L, & Astengo F. (1987). A double-blind placebo controlled evaluation of the safety and efficacy of vinpocetine in the treatment of patients with chronic vascular senile cerebral dysfunction. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 35(5), 425-30.

3. Szilagyi G, Nagy Z, Balkay L, Boros I, Emri M, Lehel S, Marian T, Molnar T, Szakall S, Tron L, Bereczki D, Csiba L, Fekete I, Kerenyi L, Galuska L, Varga J, Bonoczk P, Vas A, & Gulyas B. (2005). Effects of vinpocetine on the redistribution of cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in chronic ischemic stroke patients: a PET study. Journal of the Neurological Sciences. 229-230, 275-84.

4. Szakall S, Boros I, Balkay L, Emri M, Fekete I, Kerenyi L, Lehel S, Marian T, Molnar T, Varga J, Galuska L, Tron L, Bereczki D, Csiba L, & Gulyas B. (1998). Cerebral effects of a single dose of intravenous vinpocetine in chronic stroke patients: a PET study. Journal of Neuroimaging : Official Journal of the American Society of Neuroimaging. 8(4), 197-204.

5. Polgar M, Vereczkey L, & Nyary I. (1985). Pharmacokinetics of vinpocetine and its metabolite, apovincaminic acid, in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid after intravenous infusion. Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis. 3(2), 131-9.

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