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The World Of Strength Training 2015

Since the advent of the internet, information is passed about at blistering speed all around the globe. The problem is that 90% of it is less than credible. You have people who pop up out of nowhere and get a huge social media following and the are suddenly branded the “expert!” It irks me because most of these people are giving out awful information. One guy that comes to mind is Bostin Loyd. This guy is an utter moron. He has massive followings and dispenses information to mostly young men. It is reckless to tell people so many dangerous things. There are also guys like CT Fletcher, who just say stuff like “time to hit some mother fuckin’ triceps!” Yes, he trains hard, but he is another idiot. It’s sad that people follow people who give training a bad name. I am not hating so just stifle it if your panties are in a twist. There is a reason why after more than 30 years of lifting, I have rarely been injured. Before anybody goes to the, but you never pushed hard enough argument, trust me, I trained balls out. I have non equipped done 555 lbs on the bench press, 175 lb dumbell shoulder press for 6, squatted 750 lbs for a rep, close gripped 495 for 3, inclined 495 for 3, hack squatted 10 plates per side for 8. I won’t continue on, but suffice it to say, I was stronger than most. My training intensity was also brutal. I loved when guys would try to hang, especially on leg day. I would crush everyone except my buddy Freddy ‘The Detroit Diesel” George and my boy “Big” Ryan Bidigare. We used to lay that shit down. I would have to take a nap for 2 hours after legs just to function.

Basic Mass Stack LL

Why You Need To Develop A Strength Training Routine

Weight training takes some forethought to get solid, consistent results. It isn’t just beat the living crap out of yourself, and see what happens. Sure, that will work if you take a lot of drugs to overcome the stress you put on your system. So what does a person looking to make gains do? Well, a good start is understanding basic physiology and exercise science terminology. In simple basics, when you apply stress to the muscle (lift weights), you cause damage to the muscle tissue. The body will make that tissue bigger and stronger so that amount of stress can’t cause that amount of damage again. Enter the Overcompensation Principle- The body reacts to stress through over compensating. This is why beginners make such rapid gains. The problem arises when you wither do too little or too much training. Too little, you make no progress because you didn’t force adaptation. Too much stress, you don’t recover from the prior workout fast enough. The problem is that physiology is very individual. The Law Of Individual Differences- every one has strengths and weaknesses which need to be considered when making a routine. Recovery is a lot like intelligence; you have a spectrum from geniuses to the severely mentally handicapped. Well, you also have recovery geniuses and the recovery handicapped. You can alter this with drugs and supplements to a degree, but generally, someone who recovers poorly will always recover poorly. The best philosophy for that person is to not do too much work (sets and reps) in a given training session. Then you have recovery geniuses; you just beat these people senseless and make sure they are well fed. Like any standard bell curve, most of us lie somewhere in the middle of that curve.


How To Develop A Good Strength Training Routine

The first thing you need to do is determine what your goals are. If you’re a power lifter, your program will look completely different than would a bodybuilders. The Law Of Specificity- To get better at a specific ability, one needs to repeat that act often. If you want to swim a 5000 meter race, don’t do long distance running to prepare for swimming. Another thing that should be considered is loading or stress put on the body. The Overload Principle states that to get the body to again overcompensate, it must encounter greater stress than the prior workout. Each workout has to be either more workload or heavier weight to affect change. The next key principle is The SAID Principle- this states that you must stress the body in the same way you want it to improve. If you want to be fast, practice running fast. We will tie the next two principles together; The  Law of Use/Disuse and the Law of Reversibility. This states that if you don’t continue to train a specific skill, you will lose that ability over time. The second part of the principle is what people call muscle memory, once a skill has been trained, it is easier to regain that ability. Last but not least, is The General Adaptation Syndrome- there are 3 phases that encapsulate what we have already learned.

  1. The Alarm Stage- when the body reacts to the application of stress.
  2. The Resistance Stage- when the muscles adapt to increasing amounts of stress.
  3. The Exhaustion Stage- this is where the body will fail if forced to continue training.                          

Mind and Muscle Favicon

Putting It All Together: Making A Strength Training Routine

First off, you most decide what your goals are and work backward from there. So if you want to body build, decide what approach is best. High Volume vs low volume.? How many training days per week? What days will you take off? What is the order of the body parts being trained? I will put a sample program below for a 4 day per week training with no more than 2 days lifting in a row without a rest day. This will be done with an emphasis on chest and arms.


Incline Bench Press  4 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes

Flat DB Chest Press 3 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes

Incline DB Fly 4 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes

Machine Chest Press 3 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes

DB Front Shoulder Raise 3 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes

DB Side Lateral Raise 3 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes

DB Rear Shoulder Raise 3 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes

DB Shrug 3 x 15-20 reps rest 2 minutes


WG Pull Up 4 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes

Cable Row 4 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes

V-Bar Pulldown 4 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes

Barbell Bent Over Row (Supine grip) 4 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes

DB Curl 4 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes

DB Preacher Curl 4 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes.

Day # 3 OFF

Day #4 LEGS

Squats 4 x 8-12 reps rest 3 minutes

Hack Squats 4 x 8-12 reps rest 3 minutes

Leg Extension 4 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes

Seated Leg Curl 4 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes

Lying Leg Curl 4 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes.

RDL 4 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes

Seated Calf 4 x 20 reps rest 2 minutes

Standing Calf 4 x 10 reps rest 2 minutes

Day #5 OFF

Day # 6 ARMS

Tricep Pushdown 4 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes

Close Grip Bench Press 4 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes

Dips 4 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes

Barbell Curls 4 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes

Reverse Curls 4 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes

Machine preacher Curl 4 x 8-12 reps rest 2 minutes

** Ab work can be thrown in 3 days per week with a day of rest between exposures.

Strength Training Routine: In Conclusion

The program I wrote above is something similar to what I do right now. There is nothing fancy or sexy about it. I am like the Penn State of weight lifting, bland. While I can appreciate the artistry of a John Meadows workout, I have no time to spare to be in the gym for an hour and a half. I have one hour to get it done. I believe that is why I can train at a rapid pace and not get tired. I don’t care how much I have to suffer, I get my sessions down in one hour. The rest of the day is for making money and spending time with my family. I have spent upwards of 65000 hours in gym since I started training for a living. That breaks down into roughly 2700 days. In years, that is 7.5 years I have spent of my life in gyms. I see no need to spend 2-3 hours in the gym. I like to hit it hard, hit it quickly, and then go rest and grow. If you follow these simple rules, you can make constant progress in the gym. Good luck now get out there and apply what you learned.