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High Protein Diets

High protein diets don’t cause kidney damage according to research done at CSIRO in Australia. That still won’t likely sway the attitude of the general public and health officials.

The Study High Protein Diets Don’t Cause Kidney Damage

Researchers gathered 115 overweight adults with Type II Diabetes to participate in a study regarding protein intake. They set it up so that the participants would eat between 500-1500 less calories than they burned on a daily basis. The participants also did fitness training 3 days per week. half the subjects were on a traditional diet where they ate 53% of their energy from carbohydrates, 17% from proteins, and the last 30% from fats. Of those fats, 2/3 or more was unsaturated. The other half of the participants were put on a high protein diet consisting of 14% from carbohydrates, 28% from proteins, and the remaining 58% from fats.

Results High Protein Diets Don’t Cause Kidney Damage

Before and after the conclusion of the study, the researchers tested kidney function. They tested albumin and creatinine levels. The lower the albumin levels in your blood, the better the kidneys are functioning. Creatinine levels should also be low if the subject isn’t supplementing with creatine. For both groups, the albumin and creatinine levels were statistically no different.

Conclusion

There are no clinical differences between a high protein lower carb diet or a high carb lower protein diet when it comes to kidney function. Even with these findings, there will likely be plenty of skepticism regarding this due to the existing paradigm that high protein diets cause kidney damage. At this point, there will likely need to be more studies done to have any chance of changing this thinking. However, given the current state of nutrition, this type of study is highly unlikely.

Take Away Message

Given that government really doesn’t want to hear about high protein diets being healthy, there is a very high likelihood that people will have to do their own due diligence regarding this subject.

Medicine (Baltimore). 2015 Nov;94(47):e2181.

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