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guy squatingFibersol-2 is digestive resistant maltodextrin. Fibersol-2 is a soluble fiber that easily dissolves in water, is almost tasteless, and is not affected by heat (so it can be used for cooking). Fibersol-2 is included in many foods, drinks, meal replacement powders and weight gainer powders as a source of soluble fiber. It is also sold in fiber drink mixes either alone or in a blend along with other sources of fiber.

Fibersol-2 has all of the benefits typically associated with dietary fiber. The benefits of Fibersol-2 and other soluble fibers include intestinal regularity, growth of probiotics (healthy intestinal bacteria), and blood sugar regulation when included as part of a carbohydrate containing meal. Fibersol-2 appears safe for every day use, so using a fiber supplement containing Fibersol-2 daily can be a good way to increase daily soluble fiber intake.

One advantage that Fibersol-2 may have over other sources of soluble fiber is that it may cause less gas and bloating. Bloating and gastrointestinal distress are common side effects of increasing soluble fiber intake too quickly or of taking in too much soluble fiber at once. Soluble fiber is not absorbed as a carbohydrate, but instead is fermented in the large intestine. The rate of fermentation of Fibersol-2 in the large intestine is slower than most other sources of soluble fiber, so as a result it may produce less discomfort in those who are increasing their soluble fiber intake.


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