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Cinnamon Is A Great Glucose Disposal Agent

Japanese researchers have concluded that Cinnamon Is A Great Glucose Disposal Agent. The research used rats to test out cinnamon’s ability to increase glucose uptake in the muscle cells of the animals. The rats were given an extract of cinnamon with a high dose of MHCP, the bio-active ingredient in cinnamon. One group was given 30 mg of MHCP and the other group was given 10 times that amount. The supplementation regimen lasted for a 3 weeks duration. At the conclusion of the 3 weeks, the rats were then given IV infusions of glucose and insulin in two different protocols. The first protocol was 3 milli IU of insulin per kg body weight per minute. This process took 90 minutes to complete. The second protocol was again 10 times the amount or 30 milli IU of insulin per kg of body weight per minute. In the first dose given(30 mg/kg), the effect was the greatest.

The Results Of Cinnamon As A Glucose Disposal Agent

The low dose protocol had no effect on glucose uptake into the muscle cells, but the high dose had a strong effect. At higher doses the effect was pronounced. The wanted to understand the mechanism of insulin signaling in the muscle cells and the effect cinnamon had upon it. They came away with interesting and complex conclusions. MHCP increases the concentration of IRS-1, a signaling protein. For the receptor to work optimally, it needs IRS-1 present. Apparently, MHCP contains phosphor groups which bind with IRS-1 to increase its activity. This in turn signals the insulin receptor in the muscle cell to become more active. The more phosphor present, the more IRS-1 binds to P13 kinase enzyme which signals the insulin receptor activity. This results in more the glucose being taken up in the muscle cell from the serum (blood). The amount of the complex doesn’t change so there is no rise in proliferation, just activity of the complex. More phosphor groups= more IRS-1 binding P13 kinase= increased insulin uptake by the insulin receptor. This again shows why cinnamon is a great glucose disposal agent.

The Take Away Message Of This Experiment

Cinnamon is a good choice to increase muscle cell uptake of glucose. This has vast implications in our war on Type 2 Diabetes. This attacks our obesity problem as well. If you can shuttle glucose to the muscle over the adipose tissue, you can reduce fat storage, and lower insulin resistance. Any help in minimizing chronic disease will have massive financial implications in our ever rising healthcare costs. Human studies [Diabetes Care. 2003 Dec; 26(12): 3215-3218.] in Pakistan show that humans are more sensitive to cinnamon than rats. That is good because less is needed to get a good effect, but bad because humans have a toxicity level as well. Too much of a good thing is a bad thing you could say. In humans, doses of 1,3, and 6 grams all elicit the same effect. A 40 day course of cinnamon at these differing doses had a similar effect at lower glucose and cholesterol in human studies. This shows cinnamon to be a very useful tool in the battle on diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and hyper-cholesterol.

Great News From Mind And Muscle

We are in the final stages of development of a product that will take a multi-pronged approach to effective glucose disposal. Because we know that cinnamon is a great glucose disposal agent, it’s a staple in our formula. We have used multiple agents at varying doses and are finalizing a product that will help drive glucose into muscle cells. This is like the Holy Grail for people with Type 2 Diabetes and for those trying to lose weight. If you can take advantage of your biochemistry to get insulin to pull glucose into the muscle cells for energy, you combat obesity by burning calories instead of storing them and the added bonus of creating an environment where due to lower blood glucose, the body now needs to break down fatty acids(see ketosis) to stabilize blood glucose. Welcome to metabolic trickery 101. We here at Mind and Muscle strive to continue making cutting edge supplements to better both your health and your physique.

Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2003 Dec;62(3):139-48.

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