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guy sitting and curlingAndrostenedione, commonly referred to as “andro”, was the first prohormone ever introduced to the dietary supplement market. It was first introduced by Patrick Arnold and his company, Proviant Technologies. Androstenedione is naturally produced in the body, and it converts at a low rate to testosterone via the enzyme 17 beta-hydroxysteroid (17bHSD). One thing that made androstenedione legal to sell as a dietary supplement was the fact that it can be found naturally occurring in pine pollen.

Because of the low conversion rate of androstenedione to testosterone, large doses are needed to see any significant anabolic effect. Androstenedione has moderate estrogenic activity, and at the high dose required to see results there is enough estrogen conversion that estrogenic side effects such as gynecomastia are very possible and not uncommon.

Androstenedione was included in the Anabolic Steroid Control Act of 2004, and was banned as of January 20th, 2005. As stated before, androstenedione does not have a high conversion rate to testosterone and can easily convert to estrogen, especially at the high doses required to see results. Since androstenedione was banned, many new and more effective prohormones and designer steroids have come to take its place.

To view 100% legal and effective prohormones, click here.

References

 Roberts, S (2009). Anabolic Pharmacology.

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